Event Store Cloud provisioning

Event Store Cloud allows you to provision EventStoreDB clusters in AWS, GCP, and Azure.

The provisioning process consists of the following steps:

  1. Create a network in Event Store Cloud.
  2. Peer the new network with your own network at the same cloud.
  3. Deploy the EventStoreDB cluster.

Find the detailed guideline for your cloud provider:

This is how networking will look like when all provisioning steps are performed:

ES_Cloud_Networking

Amazon Web Services (AWS)

For AWS customers, Event Store Cloud allows provisioning an EventStoreDB cluster in the same cloud. You can create a cluster in the same region to ensure the lowest latency.

Pre-requisites:

  • You have an organisation registered in Cloud console
  • You can log in to the Cloud console as admin
  • Your organisation has at least one project
  • You are the admin of the project
  • You have access to create AWS resources in the AWS account of your organisation

The provisioning process consists of three steps:

  1. Create a network in Event Store Cloud
  2. Provision the EventStoreDB instance or cluster
  3. Peer the new network with your own AWS network

Create a network

In the Event Store Cloud console, go to the project context and switch to Networks. Then, click on the New network button.

Make sure to fill out the required information:

  • Network name
  • Cloud provider - AWS
  • Region - choose the AWS region
  • CIDR block - the new network address range

Create AWS network

In order to establish a connection between the cluster network and your own cloud network, you'd need to peer them. Currently, Event Store Cloud only supports peering within the same region. Therefore, ensure that you choose the same region as your own cloud network.

The network address range should not overlap with the address range of other networks in the same region and with your own AWS network, which you will be peering with. As any other cloud network, the CIDR block needs to be within the range specified by RFC1918.

After specifying all the details, click on the Create network button. You will be brought back to the networks list where the new network will appear as being provisioned. The provisioning process in AWS might take up to five minutes. You'd need to click on the refresh button from time to time as the view won't update automatically.

AWS active network

By clicking on the network in the list you can inspect the details like its name, status, region and address range.

Wait until the network becomes Active in the list before moving to the next step.

Deploy a managed instance

Within the project scope you can view EventStoreDB clusters for the project if you click on the Clusters menu. Initially, the cluster list is empty and you will only see the New cluster button.

When you click on the button, you get to the cluster creation form.

On the first part of the form you need to specify the new cluster name, the cloud provider (AWS) and the EventStoreDB version (currently it's only 20.6). Further, you need to choose the deployment size (single instance or three-node cluster) and whether to start server-side projections by default.

AWS cluster first part

Projections impact performance

Both system projections and user-defined projections produce new events. Carefully consider the impact of enabled projections on database performance. Please refer to the Performance impact section of the projections documentation to learn more.

The lower section of the form allows choosing the instance size for cluster nodes. Currently, only three instance sizes are available. The F1 size is the lower-edge, aiming mainly to support testing scenarios and experiments due to its low price. Other instance sizes are production-grade.

Vertical scaling

At this moment, it is not possible to change the cluster node instance size. You can still resize cluster instances by taking a backup and restoring it to a different cluster with larger or smaller instances.

AWS cluster second part

Further, you need to specify the storage capacity. One disk kind is available at the moment, but you can change the disk size. Since we allow customers to expand the storage size online without service interruptions, you can start with smaller storage and expand it when you need more capacity.

Finally, choose the network provisioned previously from the list. All cluster nodes will be attached to that network.

You will get the monthly price for the selected cluster size down below in the form.

Finally, when you click on Create cluster, the provisioning process starts and you will get a new cluster available after a few minutes.

Network peering

When the cluster provisioning process finishes, you get a new cluster (or single instance), which is connected to the network created in the first step. You won't be able to connect to the cluster since the network is not exposed to the Internet. In order to get access to the network and consequently to all the clusters in that network, you'd need to peer the Event Store Cloud network to your own AWS network. Normally, your AWS network would be also accessible by applications, which you want to connect to the new cloud EventStoreDB cluster.

Peering limitations

Currently, you can peer one Event Store Cloud network with only one AWS VPC on your account. We expect to lift this limitation in the future.

For this example, we'll use a VPC in AWS in the same region (eu-central-1).

AWS VPC details

The network page provide us enough details to start the peering process. In Event Store Cloud console, while in the same project context as the new network and cluster, click on Peering under the Project menu, then click on New peering.

Then, give the new peering a name and select the network created earlier.

AWS peering - first

Then, you'd need to fill out the remaining fields, using the information from AWS VPC screen.

Peering formAWS VPC screen
Peer AWS Account IDOwner ID
Peer VPC IDVPC ID
AWS regionVPC region, cannot be changed
Peer address spaceIPv4 CIDR

For our example, here is the complete form:

AWS peering - complete form

When you click on the Create peering button, you'll be redirected to the peering list screen with the new peering resource being provisioned. After a little while, the status will change to Intiated. If the status doesn't change after 10 minutes, delete the peering and try again, ensuring the details were entered correctly. Mismatching network region and address range are most common reasons for the peering to not being provisioned properly.

When the peering is initiated, get back to AWS console and navigate to Virtual Private Cloud - Peering Connections list. There, you will see the incoming peering request.

Incoming peering request

Select the pending peering and click on Actions - Accept request. Validate the request details and ensure that all the details match the peering, which you can see in Event Store Cloud console. If everything is correct, click on the Yes, Accept button. After you get a confirmation, you will see the peering in AWS console to become Active. Now, you can get back to Event Store Cloud console, refresh the peering list to ensure that the pending record also changed its status to Active.

Now, although both networks are now connected, AWS doesn't create proper routes automatically. To finish the setup, open the AWS VPC details and click on the route table link, then on the Routes tab. There you'll see that the network has no route to the Event Store Cloud network, so you need to create one.

Click on Edit routes and then Add route. In the Destination, enter the CIDR of the Event Store Cloud network. For the Target, choose the Peering Connection option.

AWS route

The list of available peering connections will pop up. Select the recently created peering from the list and click on Save routes. The route table would then look like shown on the screenshot below.

AWS route complete

Peering issues

You might see the peering request getting stuck. There are several reasons for this to happen, like your cloud account quota or overlapping CIDR blocks. You can find all the necessary diagnostics in the Event Console in Event Store Cloud.

At this moment, you should be able to connect to the EventStoreDB cluster in the cloud from any VM, which is connected to your AWS VPC network.

If you are using one or more subnets associated to this VPC, make sure you update the routing table for all of them, not only on the main route table of the VPC.

Depending on your setup, you might already have a connection available from your local machine to the AWS VPC using a site-to-site VPN. If not, ask your AWS administrator about the connection details, which could be a Virtual Private Gateway or Client VPN Endpoint.

Next step

You are now ready to start using the new EventStoreDB cluster in the cloud. Follow to the Using the cloud cluster section to learn more.

Microsoft Azure

For Microsoft Azure customers, Event Store Cloud allows provisioning an EventStoreDB cluster in the same cloud. You can create a cluster in the same region to ensure the lowest latency.

Azure considerations

Microsoft Azure has a few differences that you need to consider when using Event Store Cloud with Azure. We listed all currently known limitations below on this page. Please ensure you are aware of it before starting to use EventStoreDB in Azure.

Pre-requisites:

  • You have an organisation registered in Cloud console
  • You can log in to the Cloud console as admin
  • Your organisation has at least one project
  • You are the admin of the project
  • You have access to create Azure resources in the Azure account of your organisation

The provisioning process consists of three steps:

  1. Create a network in Event Store Cloud
  2. Provision the EventStoreDB instance or cluster
  3. Peer the new network with your own Azure network

Create a network

In the Event Store Cloud console, go to the project context and switch to Networks. Then, click on the New network button.

Make sure to fill out the required information:

  • Network name
  • Cloud provider - Azure
  • Region - choose the Azure region
  • CIDR block - the new network address range

Create Azure network

In order to establish a connection between the cluster network and your own cloud network, you'd need to peer them. Currently, Event Store Cloud only supports peering within the same region. Therefore, ensure that you choose the same region as your own cloud network.

The network address range should not overlap with the address range of other networks in the same region and with your own Azure network, which you will be peering with. As any other cloud network, the CIDR block needs to be within the range specified by RFC1918.

After specifying all the details, click on the Create network button. You will be brought back to the networks list where the new network will appear as being provisioned. The provisioning process in Azure might take several minutes. You'd need to click on the refresh button from time to time as the view won't update automatically.

Azure active network

By clicking on the network in the list you can inspect the details like its name, status, region and address range.

Wait until the network becomes Active in the list before moving to the next step.

Deploy a managed instance

Within the project scope you can view EventStoreDB clusters for the project if you click on the Clusters menu. Initially, the cluster list is empty and you will only see the New cluster button.

When you click on the button, you get to the cluster creation form.

On the first part of the form you need to specify the new cluster name, the cloud provider (Azure) and the EventStoreDB version (currently it's only 20.6). Further, you need to choose the deployment size (single instance or three-node cluster) and whether to start server-side projections by default.

Azure cluster first part

Projections impact performance

Both system projections and user-defined projections produce new events. Carefully consider the impact of enabled projections on database performance. Please refer to the Performance impact section of the projections documentation to learn more.

The lower section of the form allows choosing the instance size for cluster nodes. Currently, only three instance sizes are available. The F1 size is the lower-edge, aiming mainly to support testing scenarios and experiments due to its low price. Other instance sizes are production-grade.

Vertical scaling

At this moment, it is not possible to change the cluster node instance size. You can still resize cluster instances by taking a backup and restoring it to a different cluster with larger or smaller instances.

Azure cluster second part

Further, you need to specify the storage capacity. One disk kind is available at the moment (Premium SSD LRS). As we currently do not support online disk resize for Azure, you need to ensure that the disk size you choose will support your estimated data volume.

Finally, choose the network provisioned previously from the list. All cluster nodes will be attached to that network.

You will get the monthly price for the selected cluster size down below in the form.

Finally, when you click on Create cluster, the provisioning process starts and you will get a new cluster available after a few minutes.

Network peering

When the cluster provisioning process finishes, you get a new cluster (or single node), which is connected to the network created in the first step. You won't be able to connect to the cluster since the network is not exposed to the Internet. In order to get access to the network and consequently to all the clusters in that network, you'd need to peer the Event Store Cloud network to your own Azure network. Normally, your Azure network would be also accessible by applications, which you want to connect to the new cloud EventStoreDB cluster.

Peering limitations

Currently, you can peer one Event Store Cloud network with only one Azure network on your account. We expect to lift this limitation in the future.

For this example, we'll use an Azure network the same region (UK South).

In Event Store Cloud console, while in the same project context as the new network and cluster, click on Peering under the Project menu, then click on New peering.

Then, give the new peering a name and select the network created earlier.

You also need to find your tenant ID, which is only visible on the Azure AD properties pageopen in new window. Alternatively, you can use the Get-AzureADTenantDetails PowerShell commandopen in new window.

Finally, you'd need to fill out all the fields:

Peering formAzure network details
Peer Tenant IDTenant ID from Azure AD
Peer Network IDNetwork resource ID (can be found on the network Properties page or in JSON view)
Azure regionNetwork region, cannot be changed
Peer address spaceIPv4 CIDR (address space for the whole network)

For our example, here is the complete form:

Azure peering - complete form

When you click on the Create peering button, Event Store Cloud will check if it has permissions to create the peering (see Azure Considerations). The Cloud console will display a set of pre-populated Azure CLI commands, which you need to execute in order for Event Store Cloud to be able to create the peering.

Azure peering - sa

After completing all those commands, click on the Create peering button. You'll be redirected to the peering list screen with the new peering resource being provisioned. After a little while, the status will change to Intiated. If the status doesn't change after 10 minutes, delete the peering and try again, ensuring the details were entered correctly. Mismatching network region and address range are the most common reasons for the peering to not being provisioned properly.

When the peering is initiated, get back to Azure Portal and navigate to the Peering page of your Azure network. There, you will see the newly provisioned peering, which should have Connected in the Peering status column.

In a short while, the initiated peering in Event Store Cloud console should change its status to Active. You might need to refresh the list from time to time as it doesn't update automatically.

Peering issues

You might see the peering request getting stuck. There are several reasons for this to happen, like your cloud account quota or overlapping CIDR blocks. You can find all the necessary diagnostics in the Event Console in Event Store Cloud.

At this moment, you should be able to connect to the EventStoreDB cluster in the cloud from any VM, which is connected to your Azure network.

Depending on your setup, you might already have a connection available from your local machine to the Azure network using a site-to-site or point-to-site VPN. If not, ask your Azure administrator about the connection details.

Next step

You are now ready to start using the new EventStoreDB cluster in the cloud. Follow to the Using the cloud cluster section to learn more.

Considerations for Microsoft Azure

Due to differences between Microsoft Azure and other cloud providers, the provisioning process in Event Store Cloud is different from AWS and GCP. We've made a list of these differences here in order to help you make an informed decision about Cloud providers.

Network peering

When creating a peering link, Azure requires the user to configure a security principal, referencing the application ID of Event Store Cloud, and also configure and apply a role allowing that principal to modify the network resource of the remote network.

Disk resize

Currently, it is impossible to expand disks on Event Store Cloud nodes provisioned to Azure. We plan to provide this feature at a later date, but as there is no native support within Azure, implementing this requires more planning and thought on our part.

There are positive ways around this, and we advise you to choose the disk size accordingly from the start, so the volume size will accommodate the growth of your data over time. You can also backup an existing cluster and restore the data to a new cluster with larger disks.

We're aware that Azure Premium SSD volumes have a strict IOPS limit and this limit depends on the volume size. Very small volumes do not provide enough throughput for most production scenarios. We suggest you consider using at least 246 GiB disks to get enough IOPS for the database. You can check the current throughput limits for Azure Premium SSD volumes in Azure documentationopen in new window.

Resource provisioning

Azure resource provisioning speed will almost always be slower and more highly variable than other providers. Please account for this when interacting with provisioned resources on Azure.

Available regions

At the moment, you can deploy EventStoreDB clusters only in regions with three or more availability zones, and many Azure regions do not have the minimum number of availability zones to support the deployment of managed EventStoreDB clusters. In the future, we plan to allow the deployment of single node topologies to all regions. We'll also introduce a new topology that allows cluster deployments to a single availability zone.

Currently, we support following Azure regions:

  • Australia East,
  • Canada Central,
  • Central US,
  • East US,
  • East US 2,
  • France Central,
  • Japan East,
  • North Europe,
  • Southeast Asia,
  • UK South,
  • West Europe,
  • West US 2.

Pricing

Prices for computing resources (virtual machines) in Azure are generally higher, compared with AWS and GCP, and this is reflected in the costs for managed EventStoreDB deployments. As EventStoreDB requires at least two CPU cores, and the smallest instance size in Azure is more expensive, the F1 instance size in Azure is the most expensive of the three cloud providers we offer.

Google Cloud Platform (GCP)

For Google Cloud customers, Event Store Cloud allows provisioning an EventStoreDB cluster in the same cloud. You can create a cluster in the same region to ensure the lowest latency.

Pre-requisites:

  • You have an organisation registered in Cloud console
  • You can log in to the Cloud console as admin
  • Your organisation has at least one project
  • You are the admin of the project
  • You have access to create Google Cloud resources in the GCP project of your organisation

The provisioning process consists of three steps:

  1. Create a network in Event Store Cloud
  2. Provision the EventStoreDB instance or cluster
  3. Peer the new network with your own network in GCP

Create a network

In the Event Store Cloud console, go to the project context and switch to Networks. Then, click on the New network button.

Make sure to fill out the required information:

  • Network name
  • Cloud provider - GCP
  • Region - choose the GCP region
  • CIDR block - the new network address range

Create GCP network

In order to establish a connection between the cluster network and your own cloud network, you'd need to peer them. Currently, Event Store Cloud only supports peering within the same region. Therefore, ensure that you choose the same region as your own cloud network.

The network address range should not overlap with the address range of other networks in the same region and with your own GCP network, which you will be peering with. As any other cloud network, the CIDR block needs to be within the range specified by RFC1918.

After specifying all the details, click on the Create network button. You will be brought back to the networks list where the new network will appear as being provisioned. The provisioning process in GCP might take a little while. You'd need to click on the refresh button from time to time as the view won't update automatically.

GCP active network

By clicking on the network in the list you can inspect the details like its name, status, region and address range.

Wait until the network becomes Active in the list before moving to the next step.

Deploy a managed instance

Within the project scope you can view EventStoreDB clusters for the project if you click on the Clusters menu. Initially, the cluster list is empty and you will only see the New cluster button.

When you click on the button, you get to the cluster creation form.

On the first part of the form you need to specify the new cluster name, the cloud provider (GCP) and the EventStoreDB version (currently it's only 20.6). Further, you need to choose the deployment size (single instance or three-node cluster) and whether to start server-side projections by default.

GCP cluster first part

Projections impact performance

Both system projections and user-defined projections produce new events. Carefully consider the impact of enabled projections on database performance. Please refer to the Performance impact section of the projections documentation to learn more.

The lower section of the form allows choosing the instance size for cluster nodes. Currently, only three instance sizes are available. The F1 size is the lower-edge, aiming mainly to support testing scenarios and experiments due to its low price. Two instance sizes are production-grade.

Vertical scaling

At this moment, it is not possible to change the cluster node instance size. You can still resize cluster instances by taking a backup and restoring it to a different cluster with larger or smaller instances.

GCP cluster second part

Further, you need to specify the storage capacity. One disk kind is available at the moment, but you can change the disk size. Since we allow customers to expand the storage size online without service interruptions, you can start with smaller storage and expand it when you need more capacity.

Finally, choose the network provisioned previously from the list. All cluster nodes will be attached to that network.

You will get the monthly price for the selected cluster size down below in the form.

Finally, when you click on Create cluster, the provisioning process starts and you will get a new cluster available after a few minutes.

Network peering

When the cluster provisioning process finishes, you get a new cluster (or single instance), which is connected to the network created in the first step. You won't be able to connect to the cluster since the network is not exposed to the Internet. In order to get access to the network and consequently to all the clusters in that network, you'd need to peer the Event Store Cloud network to your own GCP VPC network. Normally, your GCP VPC network would be also accessible by applications, which you want to connect to the new cloud EventStoreDB cluster.

Peering limitations

Currently, you can peer one Event Store Cloud network with only one GCP network on your account. We expect to lift this limitation in the future.

For this example, we'll use a VPC network in GCP in the same region (europe-west-4).

GCP VPC details

Notice that the VPC has one subnet in the same region as the Event Store Cloud network provisioned earlier.

The network page provide us enough details to start the peering process. In Event Store Cloud console, while in the same project context as the new network and cluster, click on Peering under the Project menu, then click on New peering.

Then, give the new peering a name and select the network created earlier. You'd need to fill out the remaining fields, using the information from GCP VPC.

Peering formGCP VPC screen
Peer GCP Project IDGCP project ID, found in the project selection popup
Peer Network NameThe VPC name
GCP regionVPC subnet region, cannot be changed
Peer address spaceVPC subnet address range

For our example, here is the complete form:

GCP peering - complete form

When you click on the Create peering button, you'll be redirected to the peering list screen with the new peering resource being provisioned. After a little while, the status will change to Intiated.

GCP peering - pending

The information on the peering details screen provides some essential information to complete the peering process from GCP side.

When the peering is initiated, get back to Google Cloud console and navigate to VPC network peering. There, click Create connection and then Continue. Give new peering a name and choose the network on GCP side. Next, fill out the remaining values using the initiated peering details:

Event Store CloudGCP connection peering
Peer Project IDProject ID
Peer Network NameVPC network name

Important: expand the Exchange custom routes section and enable both Import and Export options for custom routes. It will instruct GCP to create routes automatically.

Here is how our example GCP peering form would look like:

Incoming peering request

Click the Create button and when in the VPC network peering list, click Refresh until the peering status changes to Active. The peering status in Event Store Cloud console should also change to Active.

Peering issues

You might see the peering request getting stuck. There are several reasons for this to happen, like your cloud account quota or overlapping CIDR blocks. You can find all the necessary diagnostics in the Event Console in Event Store Cloud.

At this moment, you should be able to connect to the EventStoreDB cluster in the cloud from any VM, which is connected to your GCP VPC network.

Depending on your setup, you might already have a connection available from your local machine to the GCP VPC using a site-to-site VPN. If not, ask your operations about the connection details.

Next step

You are now ready to start using the new EventStoreDB cluster in the cloud. Follow to the Using the cloud cluster section to learn more.

Cloud instance sizing guide

Use this guide to assess the needs of your application performance, compared with the capability of a given EventStoreDB instance in Event Store Cloud.

Instance performance

Performance of the managed EventStoreDB cluster in ES Cloud depends primarily on the instance size for cluster members. In addition, the disk size could affect the instance IOPS limit when it comes to reading and writing events to the database. We rate instances based on the desired usage. Our current rating include:

  • Micro
  • Development
  • Production

Throughput

A wide variety of factors impact total Event throughput on a cluster, including Events per batch and Event size and the active number of streams in the working set.

We have profiled using single event transactions for the production rated clusters and confirmed they can operate at 20k tx/sec throughput (concurrent read and write) given the correct configuration for concurrent clients, a given disk size, and Working Set. It's possible to increase the throughput by using batched write operations, but the impact of batching heavily depends on the batch size in bytes. Before placing any application into production, it is vital to perform a performance test on the planned instance to assess how these factors apply to your application.

The Working Set is the number of streams being read from and written to concurrently. It's essential to recognise that writing one million events into one million streams is a very different scenario than writing one million events into a single stream.

Cloud vs self-hosted and development setups

When load testing an application against Event Store Cloud EventStoreDB clusters, performance may differ from a self-hosted solution when utilizing a similar instance size.

Event Store Cloud utilizes ZFSopen in new window to ensure filesystem integrity/safety as well as block level compression, to ensure the minimization of IOPs and a lower storage cost for data hosted.

ZFS requires additional CPU and memory to provide these capabilities. As such a self-hosted comparison should utilize a similar configuration in order to provide a relevant comparison.

EventStoreDB requires CPU cycles to maintain indexes, and for other maintenance processes. Underpopulated or underloaded databases (such as demo or development setups) require little CPU time and overperform compared to fully populated systems with consistent throughput. Expect performance to level off as workloads increase.

Micro (F1) instance sizes

F1 instance size is designed for a low-cost development environment. We recommend using it for the experiments like Proof of Concept or extremely low workload like 10-100 events a day per database (cluster). F1 instances are using a burstable CPU class to enable this goal across all supported public clouds.

Due to the burstable CPU class, CPU shares are limited, this results in the following implications:

  • If CPU shares are not available and allocations are increasing this may result in client timeouts to the cluster or an out of memory condition.
  • CPU shares are required to maintain the cluster state topology via constant gossip message propagation. It means that the cluster needs CPU shares to maintain cluster state even when it's is not under load.
  • If a continuous load is applied it may be possible to exhaust the allowed CPU shares per time cycle, resulting in client timeouts or out of memory conditions.
  • When ESC exited Preview and went into GA we increased the size of the backing instance type as the original F1 instance size was too small to provide enough memory and CPU shares to maintain cluster state adequately even at extremely low volumes. A backup and restore is required to move to the new backing size.

Sizes

SizeRatingWorking Set (streams)Disk size (min)Concurrent clients (max)
F1Micro100k50 GB
C4Development500k100 GB
M8Development1M250 GB
M16Development / Light Production6M500 GB20
M32Production12M1 TB250
M64Production30M2 TB500
M128Production62M4 TB500
Last Updated: 9/22/2021, 1:59:50 PM
Contributors: Alexey Zimarev, Mathew McLoughlin, oskar.dudycz, ylorph